Finding a Job in North Dakota : The Bakken Formation : Spillover

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January 22, 2012

Spillover?

Yes, indeed. I first published the original page, Finding a Job in North Dakota: The Bakken Formation, on November 14, 2010. From the beginning, the search engines liked it, and the Hub generated steady traffic and occasional reader comments.

A few months ago, however, both daily viewer counts and commentary by visitors literally exploded, rocketing up to levels as high as 5,000 or more views per week. There are currently more than 1,100 comments “over there”, and a lot of them pack a lot of real meat on their bones. I encourage every reader of this Hub to click on the link and check out that Hub, at least if you’re looking for work.

You’ll be glad you did.

So…why am I adding a “spillover page”?

Simple. The huge amount of traffic has made “page #1” the premier Internet source for job seekers looking toward North Dakota and the oil drilling boom going on there…but it’s also made things rather clumsy for me, personally, when it comes to answering questions by readers.

I can get lost in the woods when scrolling up and down, picking out comments that need my response and trying not to lose a lengthy post by hitting the wrong key.

My point: Ask me a question related to job hunting in North Dakota on this page…and I should be able to get to it a little quicker.

Think of that first (and most important) “location” as the ground view for a hunter whose range of vision is limited by acres and acres of thick grass and brush, while here…yeah, more like our local redtail hawk, soaring on high and able to spot the slightest movement down below.

Upate, October 7, 2013: I just moved this over from a site where I’d written for nearly six years (but did not own the site) to this site (which I do own). As a result, 748 comments had to be left behind. Feel free to comment with questions or information to get the total picture current once again.
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Political Rhetoric vs. the Visible Trend

Any of us with a TV set have seen President Obama’s defenders claiming in various ads that he’s done wonders for the American economy. One recent production declared as fact that the administration has during the past three years created “2.7 million jobs”, turned the economy around for the better, and that all is (and will be) rosy…if only the dumb Republicans don’t prevent the wise American people from giving Obama four more years in office on Election Day in November. (But they did, as we now know.)

Say what?

Never mind the extreme likelihood that the Democrats are in this case counting every temporary Census worker employed briefly in 2010 as “a job created”. It’s not even necessary to dig into the statistics to uncover the smoke and mirrors act claiming all this “job production”.

Simply put, all we need to do is take a look at the figures for that original North Dakota jobs Hub. In the early months of its active, published life, it always got daily views…but usually fewer than 50 per day,

Beginning in the month of September (2011), however, the ramp-up in daily visitor counts was next to incredible. In recent weeks, the tally has been averaging more than 500 viewers per day (At this exact moment, the number showing on my Stats page is 578–on a Sunday.)

A tenfold increase in job seekers finding the site does not sound like an “improved economy” to me.

How about you?

UPDATE: NOVEMBER 24, 2012

Crewjohn just posted, advising job seekers one and all to take a serious look at north Texas now. Here’s a summary of what he had to say:

1. He got hired with no driving experience whatsoever and is now handling a vac truck (tractor-trailer combo), big as life and twice as profitable.

2. Pay is better than it was in Texas a year or two ago, starting generally (for rookies) at around $17 per hour. I translate that to roughly $60,000 per year if you’re working the usual oil patch 60 hour minimum weeks, but in boom times (like now), it’ll usually run more than that–sometimes quite a lot more.

3. John says there are signs screaming for CDL drivers along every county road (not the freeways) in the area, or you can just stop at a truck stop and chat up a few people, then go hit up the companies you hear about. Either way will get you hired if you’re employable at all.

2 thoughts on “Finding a Job in North Dakota : The Bakken Formation : Spillover

  1. I miss the old posts…. I found my new career on here in 2011…. Couldn’t be happier with money and guys I work with…

  2. I’ll admit, Michael, I miss the old Comments sections, too. There was a lot of good sharing from all of us, job holders and job seekers alike (plus me), that became a community of its own.

    But I really had no choice. HubPages, where these articles were posted when you found us in 2011, had been intermittently driving me nuts since 2009. By mid-2013, it was getting ridiculous. There were topics on which I was not allowed to write (guns, cigarettes, web hosting, etc.), and that was irritating–but worst of all, HP management apparently decided we writers must all be idiots and must therefore be guided by them. Every time I opened up an Edit page, there were “helpful hints” pointing out what I’d not done their way.

    So, I didn’t own that site. I do own this site. I’ve met the people behind DreamHost (whom I pay to host the site) and also those behind WordPress (who invent the software used to power the pages). All parties concerned are fiercely loyal to the concept of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, that people have the right to say whatever they want to say, period.

    All of that gives me a sense of joy and peace in my writing, now, that didn’t fully exist before. I’m my own man, which I ALMOST was before, but not quite, and that’s a huge difference.

    That said, I’m delighted you managed to find me here, AND that you’re happy with the money you’re making and the guys you work with. Knowing that means a lot to me.

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